Firefox 3 RC1

I really, really, really want to run Firefox 3. I’ve tested it out in the Beta versions and it has much better memory management, which, for me, is about the only thing I think really needs improvement in Firefox.

The problem is that Firefox 3 doesn’t accept (still) self-signed certificates. This is generally a good thing for Grandmas and Grandpas out there who don’t know about security. I don’t want them signing their life away because they click a link that doesn’t really go to their bank, or PayPal, or something else like that. But (!) I do need to be able to accept such “shady” certificates in order to use Firefox as my general web development testing browser. This is only frustrating, of course, because I can certainly keep Firefox 2 on my computer until the end of time, if I have to.

Or can I…?

When I uninstalled Firefox 3 RC1, unlike with the Beta versions, it uninstalled Firefox completely. Apparently in my haste to try it out, I didn’t realize that 3RC1 installed right on top of Firefox 2. It only took me about as long as it took to write this post to fix the problem (by re-downloading and re-installing Firefox 2), but it was annoying enough to drive me to my blog to write about it.

And since I hate it when the people with the complaints are the most vocal, let me say, with the exception of the certificate issue, I think Firefox 3 is great. If you don’t have the same problem as me, then I don’t think there’s any reason why you would not want to upgrade right now. Well, other than it’s still only a Release Candidate, so it’s possible that there are still some minor bugs to work out.

Advertisements

Posted on May 19, 2008, in Firefox. Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. So now that the policy format is as clear as mud we can go into some of the specifics. You’ ll note that, although the module, base and kernel formats are slightly different, they all share the same struct. This was done for simplicity sake since there is significant overlap and code reproduction for multiple structs would have been much harder to maintain. The most notable difference between the modular/ base and kernel formats is that they serve a different purpose. The kernel format has an efficient way…

  2. So now that the policy format is as clear as mud we can go into some of the specifics. You’ ll note that, although the module, base and kernel formats are slightly different, they all share the same struct. This was done for simplicity sake since there is significant overlap and code reproduction for multiple structs would have been much harder to maintain. The most notable difference between the modular/ base and kernel formats is that they serve a different purpose. The kernel format has an efficient way…

  3. Thats really great! but may i know from where we can get download link?

  1. Pingback: Fanatical Pupil » Blog Archive » Aardvark is Social Q&A

%d bloggers like this: